Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Serger Vs. Sewing Machine (Garment Construction)

Over the years I have made several shirts, blouses, skirts, vests, coats etc. I use my sewing machine for top stitching, inserting zippers and making button holes. For the actual construction I use my SERGER. I don't sew the seam with the sewing machine and then serge the raw edges. Why do the same function twice??? The serger joins the fabric (seams) and overcasts at the same time. I have found that this makes constructing the garment much quicker, more sturdy and withstands multiple washings without incident.

If I need the seam to lay flat then yes I will serge the raw edges first and then sew with the sewing machine. But I don't sew and then serge - too tedious.

Home Dec projects constructed with the serger are a snap!

I know old habits are hard to break - but this one is well worth it 4 U.

8 comments:

  1. Love your serging blog! you give information that is hard to find... I finally bought a serger this year and am busy learning how to use it to its full capacity. Can you give us tips on how to sew a 5/8in even seam with the serger. I find it hard to see how to feed the fabric evenly... Thank you !

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  2. Usually there are marks on the front cover of the seger. BUT - if not measure 5/8" from the left needle and over to the right and either put a big black mark or a piece of tape. Another way is - there is a hem guide for some sergers that can be adjusted to any seam allowance you want. Remember that some of the fabric will be cut by the knife. When I got my first serger I put a big mark where the raw edge of the fabric should ride.

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  3. Ok thanks, I will check if I can find a hem guide for mine because I can not mark since there is a hole to catch the cuttings and no palce to put a mark unless I invent something ;-)

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  4. Help! I recently purchased a serger because I understood that I could construct garments with it... but the seams take almost no pressure before they seperate and show horizontal stitches. I sew Ren-Faire garments and they fit snugly,and on many of them through the waistline and chest they are pulled tight. Is this a function of thread tension or is there something I am doing wrong or do I have the wrong idea all together? I have a 4 thread commmercial machine and am trying to use three threads for the seam stitch.

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  5. First make sure that the threads are seated firmly in the tension disks. Then you may need to adjust the needle thread tensions to a slightly higher number. Next I would press the seam as sewn and then press the seam to one side. If the threads are showing it usually means the tensions are not balanced and/or tight enough to hold the stitches firmly in place. For these types of garments I would suggest using Robison Anton polyester thread. We often use it for embroidery but I find that it works great in the serger. What weight/type fabric are you using? And what size needles? If the needle size is large, then perhaps the thread is smaller in diameter than the needle penetration. Last but not least - is it threaded correctly so that it is passing through all the tension areas?

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  6. CAN ANYONE PLZ PLZ PLZ HELP ME? Okay so i want to star making clothes and selling them. i have been using a sewing machine since i was 8. But i have been looking into sergers. My question is Can you construct an entire garment with a serger?

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  7. Better late that never. I used to make all my clothes with the serger. EXCEPT zippers and button holes. A while back I posted some books on garment construction. And remember if they are made with the serger - they have a professional finish.

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  8. In garment construction is there a way to hem, I guess I am asking can the blade function be removed or does it always stay in place. I like the previous comment want to start selling boutique children's clothing and am thinking of purchasing a serger in order to get a stronger seem on the garments especially the pants. From what I am reading I can serge the two pieces together and have it be stronger is that correct or in this instance do I need to serge then sew the two pieces. Also I want to start working with knits more often (I have done some on my sewing machine but usually end up screaming). I was under the impression that knitwear can be constructed entirely on a serger as well is that true

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